Call for Papers!

Author Invites for Special Issue in JCMT:

The Brain Institute of America has collaborated extensively with the Journal of Cancer Metastasis and Treatment to develop a special issue on the topic of Long Noncoding RNAs in Cancer Metastasis

For more information on this special issue in JCMT, or for more details on how to submit your manuscript, or to request if a specific paper topic is suitable for this special issue request, please see the details below.

 

 

Special Issue Details

The discovery that non-coding RNA genes are responsible for maintaining a key regulatory balance within animal cells that in turn prevents the onset of tumorigenesis and metastatic progression has been one of the largest scientific breakthroughs within the field of biological sciences. Specifically, long-noncoding RNA (lncRNAs) are epigenetic regulators that dampen stochastic gene expression, recruit specific chromatin modifiers to particular genomic loci, and communicate with other non-coding RNAs that result in the modulation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional processes that promotes the maintenance of chromatin integrity.

Specifically, lcRNAs are a divergent class of ncRNA molecule greater than 200 nt in length that lack protein-coding capacity, and initially considered a genetic byproduct because of the absence of biological function. However, when lncRNAs are aberrantly expressed the checkpoints that maintain cellular growth and differentiation processes fail, supporting a process known as epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT)…..

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Author Invites for Special Issue in Biomedicines:

The Brain Institute of America has collaborated extensively with the Journal MDPI to develop another special issue on the topic of Noncoding RNAs in Neuronal Development and Neural Type Cancers.

For more information on this special issue in MDPI, or for more details on how to submit your manuscript, or to request if a specific paper topic is suitable for this special issue request, please see the details below.

 

 

Special Issue Details

Noncoding RNA is considered the “dark matter” of the genome, since scientists know little regarding the regulatory functions associated with these genetic elements. It is, however, evident that as this regulatory variation is uncovered, new and innovative medicines are being developed to treat some of the most difficult human diseases. One such group of neoplasms involves a complex series of tumors termed “neuronal” or “neuronal–glial”, which are of recent interest because, while benign compared to the more infiltrative gliomas and astrocytomas, they can serve as a comparative to help scientists to elucidate how noncoding RNAs initiate the tumorigenic process.